To Do or Not To Do - Deburring Flashholes

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Flash holes un-deburred (L) and deburred (R).
Flash holes un-deburred (L) and deburred (R).


Q: Do you deburr the flash holes when you get a new batch of brass? If not, why not? What do you think of Hornady's new deburring tool? I thought I'd get one.
Reg Fahey


A: No, I've never gone to the trouble of deburring flash holes for hunting loads or varmint loads. Never had any reason to do so. It is only cases that have the flash hole punched through the head of the case that need doing. One of my mates goes to the trouble, but whether he benefits from it, I have no idea. He finds the Hornady deburring tool easy to use and it does each flash hole uniformly. The tool includes two floating pilots with multiple diameter steps to match the calibre you're prepping. You just choose the one that's a close fit to the diameter of the case mouth,slip it onto the shaft and screw the handle in place. Then you insert the shaft into the case and slide the pilot forward until it enters the case mouth. Holding the pilot and the case firmly together with one hand, guide the cutter into the flash hole, then push down and rotate the handle until you feel the cutter shaft bottom out. Each flash hole will be deburred uniformly. A second pilot can be stored in tandem on the shaft if the case length is less than 2.1 inches. If you are prepping longer cases, it must be removed and stored separately.

Redding Flash Hole Deburring Tool
Redding Flash Hole Deburring Tool
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