Hunter Vs Vegan Jetstar Attendant

Comments Comments

 

Pete Griffiths was boarding a flight from Melbourne to New Zealand when he was met by an employee that did not like that he was checking a bow. The attendant continued to question Pete in a manner that he described as aggressive.  

The Daily Mail reported a hunter who was stopped by a flight attendant as he tried to take a hunting bow on board a Jetstar

flight says he was abused by a 'vegan' employee. 

Mr Griffiths, who was wearing a camouflage snow jacket and hat, claims he was 'attacked' as he printed his boarding pass because of his interests and hobbies. 

In a video posted to Facebook, he claims the woman asked him numerous questions about his hunting lifestyle.

'It was pretty confronting, I was pretty intimidated,' Mr Griffiths told Daily Mail Australia.

He said the Jetstar worker asked if he had a licence to hunt. 

Mr Griffiths was checking in the bow as part of his luggage and said he had taken it on multiple flights before without being questioned about it.  

'It's got nothing to do with a licence, I'm just trying to get on the plane to fly,' Mr Griffiths said.

He also said he was asked about the bow's strings and told that if they were silicone the federal police would be called. 

Mr Griffiths claimed she was acting aggressively and was 'harassing' him in front of onlooking customers. 

He then asked the worker if she was a vegan.  

Mr Griffiths said the woman gave him a dirty look after he asked her and management was called.

'She attacked me well before I asked her if she was a vegan,' Mr Griffiths said. 

'She was abusing me. I was pretty nerve racked.' 

A member of management was called and told the hunter he had offended the employee for asking if she was a 'vegan'.

'I've officially offended someone that tried to kick me off the plane and get me in trouble with the federal police just for carrying a bow,' Mr Griffiths said.

He issued a complaint with the Jetstar management during the confrontation but has not heard anything back. 

Mr Griffiths boarded the plane successfully but said he no longer wants to fly with Jetstar. 

Jetstar told Daily Mail Australia they had policies in place to ensure passenger safety in regards to what was taken on board and had not received a formal complaint by Mr Griffith.

'Our customer service team member asked appropriate questions to understand the construction of the hunting bow to ensure our processes were followed,' a spokesperson for Jetstar said.  

When Sporting Shooter contacted Pete about the incident he said

"In my opinion as hunters we understand this and this is why we hunt we make the least impact with the most respect and take responsibility 100% for our actions our food doesn't line up!"

"Do we enjoy it hell yes, I'm sure I'm not speaking for myself here, but I don't hunt because I like to kill something in the sense that I want to murder something, hunting to me is not too much different to being like a wild animal".

"I'm a hunter I haven't been taught by other hunters but by nature. Yes I hunt, and animals die, and there's is not one piece of sustainable food I have found in this world that I can eat that a living creature has not died in support of, in my experience".

"I think everything is energy it just changes forms and vibrates differently; for example, trees can go from logs to smoke and heat, meat can go from walking padlocks as an animal to giving us sustainability. The energy continues; it doesn't stop."

Clearly, the employee is not sufficiently trained as there are no restrictions when checking a bow. They also have no jurisdiction to request hunting permits for hunts that require air travel. We can only hope that this prejudice is dealt with as many hunters use Jetstar for hunting trips to New Zealand.

 

comments powered by Disqus