PETA Slams Drought Stricken Farmers

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Publicity monger PETA has copped a barrage of negative comments after releasing an article criticising drought-stricken Australian farmers for destroying starving stock.

These articles are always a cheap attempt at publicity and they do succeed here, however, I have found the more these moronic articles are exposed to my city colleagues, friends and family the more PETA's credibility crumbles away to the people not as informed.

I am preaching to the converted here but the more people that see this group for what they are the better.

Animal rights group PETA says farmers are to blame for the premature slaughter of livestock as Australia suffers one of the worst droughts on record. 

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has published a provocative article accusing farmers of being greedy, despite rainfall being non-existent across the country.

The article came a day after the New South Government announced a $500 million emergency drought relief package, with 99 per cent of the state being in drought. 

PETA's article came in response to farmers who have recently spoken out regarding their struggle with Australia's current drought. (See pictures below)

Jess Taylor is one such Australian farmer who has had to adjust her life, as well as her family, to adapt to one of Australia's worst dry periods.

She has to pull her children, aged four to seven, out of school to assist with chores on the farm, including driving the tractor.

'The kids help as much as they can, they're just little kids but they get in and they help load the cotton seed on the trailer, feed poddy lambs and horses, help shovel it out and roll the hay out,' Ms Taylor said. 

Four year old Charlie knows if he doesn't help his family, 'the cows will die'. 

The mother-of-four from Coonabarabran, 500km north-west of Sydney, said her two eldest children take one day off a fortnight but the 'bush school' is understanding because all the students are in the same situation.

'It's pretty tough. We've still had a lot of harder grass and ground cover but every day it's disappearing, we notice it every day,' she said.

'On the other side there's nothing, not a blade of grass, just dirt.

'A lot of people are in a lot of trouble. Australia is in a lot of trouble if nothing is done soon.'

Les Jones, a farmer from Goolhi, New South Wales, said a mass shooting of 1200 sheep was his only option because his land was too dry to produce food, he could not afford to buy it, and the sheep were too weak to be sold. 

Since the Jones' family story went public, hundreds of Australians have banded together to donate money, hay and grain to the farm.

In addition to personal donations, a truck-load of feed arrived from Victoria on behalf of the Lions Club Need for Feed Disaster Relief. 

The plight of both Ms Taylor and the Jones family is not unique, with many families across the nation in a predicament that is forcing them into a corner.

 

Make your feelings known. 

 

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