Queensland Snout Bounty

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Rural Queensland councils have agreed to lobby the Queensland government for a $5 "snout bounty" in a bid to decrease the feral pig population.

The move has been described as bold as councils seek to reduce the exploding pig numbers. 

The Courier mail reported councils are worried about the danger feral pigs pose to farms and the environment, due to their potential to spread diseases and weeds.

Boulia Shire Council in the state’s far west yesterday moved a motion at the Local Government Association of Queensland annual conference calling for the bounty, and it was passed with some opposition.

Mayor Rick Britton said feral pigs were a nationwide problem that could threaten any animal-based industry, including farming and racing.

“Feral pigs are a bigger biosecurity risk than any other feral animal that we’ve got in Australia,” he said.

“They get into crops and all of that sort of stuff, so they are a major problem to (agriculture).

“Every pig has got to be a target.”

Cr Britton said it was important there was the same bounty price across the state.

Boulia council’s motion at called for councils and the Government to offer matched funding to get the bounty under way.

“Effective on-ground control of feral pigs at critical sites and during breeding periods may be one of the best methods available to combat this pest,” the motion said.

“It will never be possible to eradicate feral pigs in Queensland with existing resources however with a concerted effort by all local governments, other agencies and the inclusiveness of the general public, management is possible.”

Council also argues that co-operation between landholders, community groups and local government is essential to ensuring the bounty’s success.

Agriculture Minister Mark Furner said there was little evidence to suggest bounties were an effective way to control pests.

“The Palaszczuk Government has committed $900,000 over three years to control feral pigs, particularly to reduce the potential spread of Panama TR4 in banana growing areas,” he said.

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