• FGA Chairman Bill Paterson and ADA Executive Officer Barry Howlett representing hunters at the Australian Senate inquiry into gun-related violence.
    FGA Chairman Bill Paterson and ADA Executive Officer Barry Howlett representing hunters at the Australian Senate inquiry into gun-related violence.
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Representatives from major Australian hunting and shooting organisations have presented evidence at the Australian Senate inquiry into gun-related violence. The Greens-initiated inquiry was no doubt intended to stitch up shooters, with a view to imposing yet more restrictions on law-abiding firearms owners. As it turns out, though, the inquiry has ended up being a triumph for shooters.

Barry Howlett, Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Deer Association (ADA), and Bill Patterson, Chairman of the Field and Game Association, both attended the inquiry in Melbourne. According to a press release from the ADA, of the nearly 400 submissions that were received, only a handful were supportive of tighter restrictions of gun laws.  The vast majority of submissions were from hunting and shooting organisation, wholesalers and individual shooters, and were well-written and thoroughly researched. Those that made submissions, including the members of the contributing organisations, are to be congratulated for such a well-co-ordinated, co-operative and cohesive approach to taking the fight to our enemies. It is certainly something we need to see more of, and shows the value of belonging to a hunting organisation. You can read the full press release from the ADA HERE.

During the course of the inquiry, most of the arguments that the Greens sought to advance were thoroughly discredited by the evidence and submissions presented to the inquiry. As an example, the Greens commonly publicise their assertion that most of the illegal firearms used by criminals are stolen from law abiding firearms owners.  They want people to believe this so that they can push for tighter firearms storage laws including, potentially, the requirement for alarms on gun storage facilities. However, the inquiry heard that there little evidence that this is the case and that the available data actually shows that firearm theft from licensed gun owners is in fact very, very low.  You can read a Weekly Times article about this finding HERE.

Further information about the outcome of the inquiry can also be found in a press release from the Sporting Shooters Association of Australia. 

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